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The New York Times discusses Dorothy Day's Catholic Worker Movement

11th July 2016

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Dorothy Day coupled generosity, prayer and protest to help found the Catholic Worker Movement in New York. Its agenda: justice and charity, pacificism and spreading the wealth.

Sam Roberts discusses Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance for The New York Times Bookshelf.

Born in Brooklyn in 1897 and a convert to Catholicism (from Mayflower stock), Dorothy Day coupled generosity, prayer and protest (she was arrested eight times) to help found the Catholic Worker Movement in New York. Its agenda: justice and charity, pacificism and spreading the wealth.

In Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker:The Miracle of Our Continuance” (Empire State Editions, Fordham University Press, $39.95), gripping photographs by Vivian Cherry invigorate Day’s own description of her agenda’s quotidian demands.

Read the full article here.

“Some days when it rains,” Day wrote of a soup kitchen on Chrystie Street, “and the cellar flooded and drowned rats and soaking newspapers and old mattresses contribute a peculiar odor of decay, and the walls drip and the banisters are slimy and the lights have to burn all day even on the top floor to dispel the gloom and one of the women has had one of her spells (for several days and nights), cursing and wailing — then it is indeed hard to love one another.”

Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance is available to order on the Fordham University Press website.

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