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Introducing Maine's Poet Laureate

JULIA BOUWSMA

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  • WINNER OF THE MAINE LITERARY AWARD FOR POETRY
  • FINALIST FOR THE JULIE SUK AWARD
  • SELECTED AS ONE OF NPR'S 2018 GREAT READS
  • ONE OF BOOK RIOT'S 50 MUST READ POETRY COLLECTIONS OF 2019

"Julia Bouwsma’s chilling tale of the quietus of Malaga Island is shattering in its simplicity. The ease with which an ‘undesirable’ culture can be summarily disappeared is not a grim aberration relegated to a long-ago past—it’s a monster of the here-and-now. This is a chilling commentary, compassionate and character-driven, penned by a poet who is resolute and relentless as witness."—Patricia Smith

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JIM MACKIN AT THE BLOOMINGDALE NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY GROUP

Notable New Yorkers of Manhattan's Upper West Side: Bloomingdale-Morningside Heights

Nearly 600 captivating stories of notable former residents of Manhattan’s Upper West Side, some famous, some forgotten

"Jim Mackin’s work will add an extra dimension to your enjoyment of this marvelous neighborhood. What fascinating people lived, wrought, wrote, schemed and sang behind those windows we pass every day!"—Gilbert Tauber, nycstreets.info

New Books Network on The Neighborhood Manhattan Forgot

In northern Manhattan in 1841, the naturalist John James Audubon bought 14 acres of farmland on the banks of the Hudson River and built his family a home far from the crowded downtown streets. Audubon’s country homestead is long gone, but his story launches Matthew Spady’s The Neighborhood Manhattan Forgot: Audubon Park and the Families Who Shaped It (Fordham UP, 2020). The book traces the complex path by which woodlands became a multi-ethnic big-city neighborhood. Framing his narrative in the lives of two families—the Audubons and the Grinnells—Spady tells how family dysfunctions, economic crises, and technological change created a Manhattan neighborhood that no one could have predicted at its birth.

This interview was produced with the collaboration of the Gotham Center for New York City History.

Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York. He can be reached at rwsnyder@newark.rutgers.edu.

AWARD WINNING TITLES & AUTHORS

2021 Ruth Benedict Prize, Association for Queer Anthropology

The book is an impressively rich and nuanced ethnographic account of the everyday lives of hijras, what is often translated as one of India’s “trans” populations. Throughout twenty-four months of fieldwork, Saria followed hijras as they attended ceremonies, begged in trains, engaged in sex work, and spent time in their homes.

2021 Joseph W. Elder Prize in the Indian Social Sciences

The AAIS Book Prize Committee found Hijras, Lovers, Brothers compelling, ethnographically rich, theoretically insightful, and elegantly written.

French Voices Award for Excellence in Publication and Translation

Stiegler’s book reorients Foucault's genealogy of neoliberalism by emphasizing the Darwinian (or Spenserian) rhetoric of adaptation as it arose in the Lippmann-Dewey debates. It forms a critique of the neoliberal imperative to “adapt,” and has served as a key text in resistance to reforms. According to philosopher and academic Perry Zurn: "This book is cleanly and compellingly written, deeply researched, crisply conceived, and flawlessly executed. It offers an intriguing new genealogy for the development of neoliberalism”. Stiegler’s work covers a well-trodden subject from a new and fascinating approach, and its clear prose is accessible to scholars and non-specialists alike.

When we speak of mass killers, we may speak of radicalized ideologues, mediocrities who only obey orders, or bloodthirsty monsters. Who are these men who kill on a mass scale? Where is their conscience? Don't they feel horror or compassion? According to writer-psychiatrist-anthropologist Rechtman, it is not ideologies that kill, but people. This book descends into the ordinary life of people who execute hundreds every day, the same way others go to the office. Bringing philosophical sophistication to the ordinary, the book constitutes an anthology of mass killers. Rechtman’s book has received high praise from readers and scholars alike for its compelling perspective and originality.

Should a writer work in a former colonial language or in a vernacular? The language question was one of the great, intractable problems that haunted postcolonial literatures in the twentieth century, but it has since acquired a reputation as a dead end for narrow nationalism. This book returns to the language question from a fresh perspective. Instead of asking whether language matters, The Tongue-Tied Imagination explores how the language question itself came to matter.

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